About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
CNN 4
CSPAN 3
CSPAN2 3
WHUT (Howard University Television) 3
KGO (ABC) 2
WMAR (ABC) 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WETA 1
WJLA 1
WTTG 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but they face a daunting task. damage running into some $30 billion u.s. the government says it has already paid compensation to half of those affected by this tsunami. in one area, the situation is better. the city's south of santiago was badly damaged. seven people were killed, and even the city hall in the church were destroyed. but when you're on, the mayor is optimistic. -- one year on. construction work is proceeding at a good pace. >> [speaking foreign language] [translation in german] >> in may year managed to convince a organizations to help with their plans -- the mayor managed to convince aid organizations. again, old materials are being reused. only cla is missing. -- clay is missing. >> the school has been providing help to this area for almost one year. >> [speaking foreign language] . >> the school also found a donor willing to provide two years' worth of health-care supplies for the center. the mayor is visiting a family that will be the first of 700 to get a proper house. i asked why things have not improved faster in this area. >> [speaking foreign language] [translation in ger
with jeremy bowen in london. >> the u.s. jets returning to their base in italy. the decision to use air power against colonel gadhafi in libya was taken quickly, so quickly that they are still sorting out the politics behind it. if that is one reason for the london conference, assembling ministers and diplomats from 40 countries, and the arab league and the african union to back u.n. resolutions. though thertheir enthusiasm for military action varies. the mandate to protect civilians also means taking sides in a civil war. >> we made the right choice, that was to draw a line in the desert sand to halt the murderous advance of gaddafi's forces. no one has yet to explain when or how that commitment ends. the conference also said -- started the process toward more legitimacy. this is the closest of rebels have to a political leadership and would like more help on the ground, too. >> the americans said they would consider arming the rebels. is that something you would like? >> you can see that they are fighting with machine guns, etc. >> the u.s., france, and britain are talking about army the re
with the battle -- the bbc middle east. it starts with jeremy bowen in london. >> the u.s. jets returning to their base in italy. the decision to use air power against colonel gadhafi in libya was taken quickly, so quickly that they are still sorting out the politics behind it. if that is one reason for the london conference, assembling ministers and diplomats from 40 countries, and the arab league and the african union to back u.n. resolutions. though thertheir enthusiasm for military action varies. the mandate to protect civilians also means taking sides in a civil war. >> we made the right choice, that was to draw a line in the desert sand to halt the murderous advance of gaddafi's forces. no one has yet to explain when or how that commitment ends. the conference also said -- started the process toward more legitimacy. this is the closest of rebels have to a political leadership and would like more help on the ground, too. >> the americans said they would consider arming the rebels. is that something you would like? >> you can see that they are fighting with machine guns, etc. >> the u
will not be defeated. further air strikes have been taking place in the u.s. secretary of state has been suggested in that aids for khaddafi may be looking for a way out. >> angry and characteristically defiant, colonel gaddafi appeared to be in the compound targeted by an allied missile on the first night. for the supporters with him and watching, he said that he would keep on fighting against libyan rebels and the international forces. he said that he is not afraid. he said that he is the fiat, his home is here, and he is here. colonel gaddafi has pledged that there will be no surrender. the revolution for imperialism came on another night when there was fire around the capital. here bringing traffic into the streets rather than heading for cover. from hillary clinton comes the suggestion that gaddafi might be looking for an exit strategy. >> i am not aware of his personally reaching out but i do know of people allegedly on his behalf reaching out. this is a very dynamic situation. >> diplomatic strategies are being pursued to convince the libyan leader to take another course. these pictures pro
on rebels this hour. new targets, more carnage and the intense pressure for u.s. military action. >>> also, the crisis that libya keeps pushing up gas prices across the country. that's creating more economic misery here at home, and new political danger for president obama. plus, protesters warn the u.s. congress may, may be on the brink of stoking new violence against muslims. anger and anticipation are building before controversial hearings this week on islamic extremism in america. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." libya centering the fourth week of what's now a full-fledged civil war. moammar gadhafi's forces are claiming new gains in their pounding of rebel-held cities. gadhafi maintaining a tight grip on the capital of tripoli, and the opposition appears to be holding out to benghazi in the east, but there are conflicting reports about who is in control of several other key cities, where fierce, fierce battles have been raging now for days. diplomatic sources at the united nations say the united states is working with france and britain on draft resolution on libya, a
the equivalent of the pentagon. in the war against iraq, the u.s. war was committed from a headquarters in florida. they have a communications established with the commanders in the region in on the ground. host: what does it mean for the united states? guest: the and that is this is trying to hand off responsibility for the mission as quickly as possible. they wanted to do the things that only the united states could do, provide rapid command- and-control structure to get the operation going rapidly and effectively. and then to use the u.s. military firepower to destroy and dismantle gaddafi's command- and-control systems and particularly his surface to air missile capability. that is very important because no one -- everyone wants to minimize the danger to pilots enforcing the no-fly zone, and taking out those missile sites becomes very important to enable that. but that is the initial phase. that is starting to wind down if you look at the number of targets, the number of sites already it, i think this operation has been designed so that the u.s. could do the thing that the unit -- t
this speech. defending his actions and explaining why this intervention matters to the united states. with u.s. tomahawk cruise missiles still launching off libya shores, president obama said he had little choice but to step in. >> and as president, i refused to wait for the images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action. >> reporter: libian leader gadhafi he said was on the eve of touching off a massacre. the president made his case at the national defense university before an audience filled with u.s. military leaders. nato, he said, has already taken away much of the u.s. burden in libya but the u.s. military is still playing an active role, helping libian rebels claw background lost to gadhafi forces. while the president calls gadhafi a tire ant who needs to leave, he said the military will stop short of forcing him out, comparing it to the war in iraq. >> regime change there took years and thousands of american and iraqi lives and a trillion dollars. that is not something we can afford to repeat if libya. >> reporter: and the president went to great lengths to frame libya as a h
that radiation contaminated tap water. >>> a u.s. soldier has pleaded guilty that he and other soldier s killed for sport last year, photographs were apparently showing him and others posing over the bodies of dead afghans. those are the headlines. "world business today" starts right now. >>> hello again. good morning from cnn london. i'm charles hodson. >> and good afternoon from cnn hong kong, i'm pauline chiou. this is "world business today." the top stories on thursday, march 24th. portugal's prime minister quits as parliament votes down plans to tighten austerity measures. now an eu bailout looms. >> japan's devastating earthquake continues to disrupt the global supply chain. we look at why it can be harder to get ahold of a toyota car or an ipad 2. >>> and as the battle for libya continues, europe and the united states tighten their grip on assets owned by moammar gadhafi. >>> well, as many european countries continue to battle their way out of debt, portugal may be next in line for a big bailout. portugal's parliament just rejected a new proposal for more austerity measuring adding to th
. >> you were reporting this on "world news" last night. more missile strikes for the u.s. and allies against libya. now there is growing concern over how gadhafi will respond and whether he'll make good on his threat of terrorism. >>> and the latest from japan this morning. officials there saying the death toll now tops 18,000 this morning. an incredible number. and new concerns about radiation. contaminating, not only the tap water, but the vegetables there and seafood. we'll have a live report from the quake zone. >>> and in this country, a spring roared in california. snow, ice, rock slides shutting down major highways this morning. sam is standing by with the very latest on that. >> the first full day of spring, david. >>> let's get right to libya. and the latest actions by the u.s. and its allies. french fighter jets for the third day in a row, headed to libya. we have a team of correspondents, covering all of the angles this morning, starting with martha raddatz, in washington where she's been reporting all through the night. >> reporter: good morning, robin. the strikes have t
you can't ask for unmanned drones from the u.s. what else would you need, particularly from the iaea? >> i believe we have been asking for help from the iea -- iaea and from the united states. we will require and we will ask for assistance as needed. we will not hesitate to ask for help if we feel it is necessary. >> in terms of the humanitarian situation, what is your assessment of how that is progressing? how are you getting essentials supplies for those in such desperate need, bearing in mind that weather conditions and the nuclear situation on going? >> i believe the earthquake itself, magnitude 9.0, unprecedented. many of the roads, land communications are destroyed. our immediate response was sending in almost 80,000 troops and rescue forces to rescue people. we succeeded in rescuing 26,000 people. now, as you say, the issue of how to support and released those displaced, -- and rel ieve those displaced, that is a concern for us. we set up headquarters at the ministerial level to address this issue quickly. we are using our forces to send in necessary material. take an example
that more people had died in the villa, at what point does the u.s. say that now we are going to do something? how many people have to die? how many threats to their need to be to our energy needs? >> jake, i would simply say -- and remind you -- when you say that this has been a couple of weeks already, that is a remarkably short period of time from the time when colonel gaddafi was perceived to be, and was, in control of his country to the point where the international community is imposing substantial and punishing sanctions on him and his regime. the international community, speaking with one voice, calling for him to step down and cease the violence against his own people. we are talking about a matter of days and weeks that this has transpired within. i am aware of the ongoing violence. as the president just did with australia, we are again calling on the libyan regime to stoppin the in humane, brutal, unacceptable assaults on its own people. and for colonel gaddafi to step aside, as he has lost legitimacy in the eyes of his people and the world. >> i was not -- i was talking
, delivering aid. more u.s. ships are expected today or later this week. search and rescue teams from fairfax county, virginia, are there, others from los angeles are expected in japan soon. japan's prime minister went on tv again today to assure people that every effort is being made to get to victims of this massive disaster. >> translator: so with regard to the earthquake and tsunami, i am confident that the japanese people can be united to work together to weather this difficulty. >> japan's meteorological agency says the worst may actually not be over. there's a good chance of a magnitude 7.0 or larger quake in the next three days. >>> rescue and recovery, they are japan's top two priorities right now. let's go live to the search for survivors. any sign of life where are you? >> reporter: well, randi, i can tell you that just standing and looking out the immediate rescue immediate rescue has sloan down because night has fallen. we're not hearing that many choppers on the air. the rescue crews on the ground are starting to pull back. they have to wait until daylight for the bulk of the ne
the democrats and republicans. >> reporter: so far the u.s. is taking the lead role on launching those attacks. this is video from moammar gadhafi's compound, from what appears to be crews missile strikes. top obama administration officials are going to great emphasis to -- great efforts to say the coalition is minimal. >> we'll have a minimal role. >> reporter: but some democrats and republicans are expressing concern that the mission in libya is not defined and there's no end plan. senator john kerry says the goal is not to remove moammar gadhafi from power. >> i would not call it going to war. this is a very limited operation that is geared to save lives. >> reporter: now, oakland congresswoman barbara lee joined a call with other liberal house democrats over the weekend, questioning the constitutionality of the operation. they say congress should have been involved. reporting live from washington, d.c., alison burns, ktvu channel 2 news. >> thank you, alison. 7:17. president obama, meanwhile, continues his five-day tour of latin america with a stop in chile. the president is expected to ar
with the very latest. >> reporter: this is what the u.s. and it allies are trying to stop. gadhafi forces pounding rebels in the western city of misrata. the rebels claim this video i don't was taken friday even after gadhafi announced a cease fire. in fact gadhafi seemed determined to carry out a bloody threat to retake the rebel strong hold benghazi. he said he would show no mercy and no compassion. all this prompted a grave commander in chief to issue a blunt warning. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforced through military action. >> reporter: president obama spoke shortly after briefing 18 congressional leaders, including many wary of yet another military engagement in a ththir muslim country. but in benghazi, rebels cheered the u.n. decision to come to their rescue. >> very happy. >> reporter: as the fighting continues, the president is sending his secretary of state to paris to consult again with the allies. >> colonel gadhafi's refusal to
-- the u.s. should not do this unilaterally. but at the nato summit meeting with defense ministers thursday, he needs to come out of that meeting, nato needs to come out with a plan of action that sends a clear message to gadhafi and the people around him, your days are up, the game is over. >> david, will cain here. i want to ask a question, we could be waiting on an international coalition or approval to sanction action. i've been asking this question over and over -- why would we intervene in libya, i still haven't received an answer that totally satisfies me. the most consistent one is that it would be the right thing to do because people are dying. for altruistic reasons. here's my question -- if we're looking to do the right thing, why do we need international approval to do the right thing? >> i think it's extraordinarily important especially with the president who is committed to the principles of international cooperation, collaboration, working through the u.n. i think it's extremely important that this president stick to his principles. i do think he's going to have a hard time g
. in the u.s., they're not concerned so they lobby in a different direction. >> thank you. i will ask one more question. this is my second round. if you fast forward to today and look at the other end of the buchan, march 4, 2011, problems we have now, the chair has described moral hazard and the like. we talked about that. what did you do? i can anticipate your answers as i think you've given them, just to make it very clear on the record, what would you recommend march 4, 2011? >> briefly, first, i want to emphasize the things we have said. one, you need more capital. and that you need increasing capital has to be with the size of the bank's, the risk of too big to fail. it has to be that this distortion has to be eliminated. secondly, if you have a problem, you should play by the ordinary rules of capitalism. when you go into bankruptcy, you convert that to equity. it is really a version of the standard rules of capitalism. you look at the numbers back in citibank, they had enough long- term capital it was more than enough to manage them, more than we put in. the answer -- the resoluti
questions. in that same interview i asked defense secretary gates will the u.s. have been fully pulled out of this mission by the end of 2011. secretary gates says there's no one who has an answer to that question. and the american people are skeptical and have a lot of questions. this military action has a 47% approval rating. that's allow. usually when the u.s. launches a military action there's a rally around the flag. you see numbers in the 60s and 70s. the president has his work cut out for him, that's why he's speaking to the american people tonight to boost his support and explain why they're there. >> and he will emphasize that no u.s. ground troops will be used. jake, thanks very much. we'll cover the president's address, diane sawyer will anchor at 7:30 eastern. and you can see it on abc. >> anxious to hear what the president is going to say. >>> there was an unusual apology from the vice president's office after a biden staffer ushered a reporter to a storage closet to wait there. it appears that they did not want the orlando sentinel talking before the vice president shows up.
that the u.s. finally got involved. the majority of americans believe that was the right move. i said last week, you can't criticize the president on that. it's the timing. it's the timing of this issue and then what was the full fledged mission down the road. and you start adding up now the costs, this is what i think is going to wake up america. do you know that already, this has cost us $1 billion? each one of those tomahawk missiles, 140 of them ohave bee used. $30 million a piece. that f-15 that crash landed $30 million. what about the united states starts arming the rebel? we're talking about billions of dollars here. we have an economic crisis on the home front. >> let's talk about somebody else. is there any doubt in our foreign policy when you look at people that are thorns in our side, it's iran and syria. for some reason, this administration has looked at the eye doctors and said he's a reformer. he's going to bring change. i can't see any change that's good. hezbollah has been financed. hamas has been financed. their allegiance with iran has never been stronger. now, something
at the end of the war in which benjamin franklin was one of the key u.s. and initiators. over the course of many months the five peace negotiators are meeting in paris hashing out terms of the independence of the united states. lots and lots of sticking points, but their resolve all of them until they get to one last one in the fall of 1782. and the sticking point concerns whether the u.s. is going to be made responsible for giving compensation to loyalists his property has been confiscated during the war. most of the other american negotiators are okay, but benjamin franklin will not give in on this point. he says, if you grant compensation i'm not going to sign the treaty. we have to keep fighting the war. and it anticipates his later act of property related. the two rarely ever meet again. at think these family divides do matter, and i do think what i think about most is that getting into the personalities and into the individual experience is important for explaining how history has operated. >> he said that this is the first book about the loyalist exile, refugee what to you feel sh
at a time of the peace negotiations at the end of the war and which benjamin franklin was one of the key u.s. negotiators. over the course of many months, the five peace negotiators are meeting in paris and hashing out all of the terms of the independence of the united states, and lots and lots of sticking points along the way that they resolve all of them until they get to one last one and the kind of fall of 1782i guess it is, and the sticking point concerns whether the u.s. is going to be made responsible for getting the compensation to loyalists whose property has been confiscated during the war. and on this point, you know, most of the other american negotiators are okay with it on adams and john but benjamin franklin will not give in on this point, and he says if you grant compensation, not going to sign the treaty. we have to keep on fighting the war. so if you want the reverse -- it anticipates his own leader acted sort of property related tensions. he largely rights will get out of the war leader and again they rarely ever meet again so i think the family to fight does matter and it
.at the moment we don't hae the information we need to form a clear picture. >> france is also hosting the e.u.'s most ambush tious and expensive nuclear project to date. work is underway on an experimental fusion reactor. the european commission is pumping $7 billion into the project, but now may have to reconsider. let's move on to other international news now, and the united arab emeritus says it has sent some 500 police officers in to bahrain to calm anti-government protests by the kingdom's shia muslim majority. earlier on monday, some 200 saudi military vehicles entered bahrain carrying troops. bahraini state television shows footage of a convoy crossing a convoy and bahrain called on other gulf states to help kwell the demonstrations which are calling for more democracy. the opposition has called the move an act of war. roadblocks set up on protestors sunday to prevent access to the financial business harbor have remained in place. >> well, the libyan government says its forces continue to make advances against rebels in the east of the country. a rebel spokesman has denied claims that gov
with commenting on recent comments that were made about fairness in the u.s. tax code even though it's not a tax code discussion. i want to clarify that i guess my definition of fairness isn't the same as what's described when 45% of the american people don't pay any income tax at all. the top tax bracts are paying 35% of their income and the top are paying 70% of all income tax. i disagree with that definition of fairness and i want to clarify that in the context of budg budg budg budgetary. the epa, this is a different direction than what has been taken so far. they have five education efforts in their recent congressional document talking about support and work and partnership with k-12 schools. federal and state agencies to establish priorities and leverage resources. lastly, an effort to increase promotion of green principles and increase the nation's scientific education. i would like to know if the department of education has been involved in those efforts through the e prngs a because it seems they should be talked about in education, not through epa. >> we had a good partnership with ad
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)